photography

...now browsing by tag

 
 

PhotoTube Update

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Sorry for not posting much during February. I’ve been spending most of my time working on PhotoTube.info and I’m starting to see results. For one thing, it now contains over 800 instructional photography videos. Be sure to check it out. Here is a list of current categories and the number of videos in each category:

Christmas Gift Ideas and Stocking Stuffers for Photographers

Monday, November 26th, 2012
My Take: I found this article by Mark Laurie from 2011. Most of it still applies for 2012 so I decided to share it with you. I deleted a few suggestions and added some links to help you shop for the items.

A Master Photographer shares his popular annual list of gift ideas to help give you some ideas for the photographer on your holiday shopping list. These aren’t just the normal things, though, but cool stuff that they will ask, “Wow, where did you find this?” Finding a gift for a photographer can be tricky – where does the non-photographer look? Well, here you go, from the fun to the serious, along with the obscure. This will make it easy for you.

1. Canon/Nikon Mugs store. Not really a camera accessory but I think these are just fun. Just be careful you don’t grab the real lens and pour coffee into it.

2. Wacom tablet. They come in different sizes with the Bamboo line for the starters, and the Intous line for the real creative types. Once they start using this to work on their images, the mouse will feel like a puck! Starts at $125. Most camera stores carry this.

3. Exotic lens. Bigger budget? Buy an exotic lens, super wide angle Fisheye, long telephoto or a macro lens. If you aren’t knowledgable about what you are buying, always buy the same brand lens as the camera.

4. The Eye-Fi. It’s not just a memory card, but a wireless transmitter so you can upload your images to the computer or your favorite photo sharing site. You can also get cards to work with smart phones and the iPad. $99 Click to continue »

Article source: http://ezinearticles.com/6715164

Review: Digital Landscape Photography

Saturday, June 30th, 2012

Summary: I highly recommend Digital Landscape Photography by John and Barbara Gerlach. If you are at all interested in landscape photography, get this book! Digital Landscape Photography covers cameras, lenses, exposure, composition, HDR, and panoramas.

Table of Contents

  • Chapter 1. Landscapes are Everywhere
  • Chapter 2. Cameras and Accessories
  • Chapter 3. Choosing and Using Lenses
  • Chapter 4. Mastering Exposure
  • Chapter 5. Techniques for Sharp Images
  • Chapter 6. Light on the Landscape
  • Chapter 7. Composing Pleasing Images
  • Chapter 8. Special Subjects
  • Chapter 9. High Dynamic Range Images
  • Chapter 10. Panoramas

Review: The chapter on cameras and accessories emphasizes investing in a camera system not just the camera. The authors recommend Canon and Nikon cameras because both brands have an excellent selection of lenses and accessories. This is the same advice that I give my students. The book is filled with excellent tips such as how to use a back button to auto-focus rather than having the shutter button initiate the auto-focus function. 34 out of 36 customer reviews on Amazon, give Digital Landscape Photography 4 stars and above with 26 5 star reviews. This is an outstanding book that is clearly written and informative. Click to continue »

Practice, Practice, Practice

Thursday, May 31st, 2012
My Take: Practice is important! As I found out recently, even an experienced photographer can feel awkward after a period of inactivity.

What Does Practice Mean When It Comes to Photography?

In sports or almost anything else one learns there is a period of practice or apprenticeship, a time of learning. I’ve said before that one needs to take lots of pictures as part of the learning process. But like anything else try and do the ‘practice’ part correctly.

If someone were to drill scales on the piano but started off and kept going while doing them incorrectly they would have drilled an incorrect procedure into their muscle memory. The same could be said for a sport like ballet or martial arts. Hundreds, even thousands of hours are spent repeating certain motions in these arts until they become natural, fluid and if not effortless and least they look effortless.

Elite athletes continue to do basic drills. You can watch professional hockey players drill puck handling and skating. Professional musicians will practice their scales and new songs over and over and over. An Olympic level gymnast makes it look so easy. But the hours of practice that go into the routine to make it look so effortless, most of us could not even imagine.

But there are gradients to everything. And one should learn while one does. I see many people taking reasonably good photographs that with a few minor tweaks could be improved considerably. Part of this is working with one of your main tools, your camera. A lot of photos that I see posted are slightly washed out. Most cameras have a setting whereby you can adjust the contrast and brightness. If you have a camera with this option (check the menu), then try a couple of hundred pictures with these functions adjusted. See if you like them better.

Read the rest of What Does Practice Mean When It Comes to Photography.

Black and White Photography with a DSLR

Sunday, April 8th, 2012

Why Shoot in Black and White?

The answer is simple; black and white is timeless. Black and white images transcend the here and now to stand on their own. It is easier to see the art in a black and white image because the image is removed from reality. Rather than mentally comparing the photographic image to the actually subject as perceived by the eye, the viewer is forced to examine the image as something separate from reality — something that has a life of its own.

Using a DSLR to Take Black and White Photos

Even though you can use Adobe Photoshop to convert a color photograph into a black and white photograph, the best results are obtained by taking the photograph in black and white. There are those that would contend that Photoshop is better but I prefer being able to get instant feedback via my LCD while taking the photo. Being able to evaluate a shot immediately after taking it is one of the main advantages of using a digital camera. I don’t have to imagine what the image would look like in B/W — I get to actually see it. I prefer to not lose that ability. Besides, if you save your images in camera raw and JPEG, you get the best of both worlds. The camera raw file will be in color and can be processed later. I prefer to have the most opportunities to make creative decisions. For me, creativity occurs before, during, and after the shoot. Click to continue »

Video: HDR & IR Photographs

Sunday, March 11th, 2012

I uploaded an HD video compilation of some of my high dynamic range (HDR) and infrared (IR) photographs. I created the music using Sony Acid. Hope you enjoy.


Use the following links to find out more about HDR and IR:

Review: The Digital Photography Book, Part 4

Friday, March 9th, 2012

The Digital Photography Book, Part 4Summary: The Digital Photography Book, Part 4 by Scott Kelby is a worthy addition to his series of digital photography books. It picks up where volume 3 left off and, like the other books in the series, contains many useful tips written in a non-technical, conversational style.

Scott Kelby, author of The Digital Photography Book(the best-selling digital photography book of all time), is back with another follow-up to his smash best-seller, with an entirely new book that picks up right where volume 3 left off. It’s even more of that “Ah ha, so that’ s how they do it,” straight-to-the-point, skip-the-techno-jargon stuff people can really use today, and that made volume 1 the world’s best-selling book on digital photography.

Click to continue »

Moon Watch: March 2012

Monday, February 13th, 2012

There will be many opportunities to shoot the moon in March. The moonrise/sunrise and moonset/sunset will be close to each other on the horizon. According to the Photographer’s Ephemeris, the optimum days will be on March 8 and 9. The timing could be better but it may be possible to photograph both the moonset and sun in the same area of the sky. Unfortunately, moonrise will not be during the blue hour but you might want to try to catch it when it rises.

Location: Miami, FL (All Times EST)
Sun Moon
Date/Phase Rise Set Rise Set
Mar 6/98% 6:39 AM 6:26 PM 4:54 PM 5:05 AM
Mar 7/Full 6:38 AM 6:26 PM 5:57 PM 5:46 AM
Mar 8/99% 6:37 AM 6:27 PM 7:01 PM 6:26 AM
Mar 9/96% 6:36 AM 6:27 PM 8:05 PM 7:08 PM
Mar 10/90% 6:43 AM 6:28 PM 9:11 PM 7:51 PM

Read my post “How to Shoot the Moon.”

Review: Photographically Speaking: A Deeper Look at Creating Stronger Images

Tuesday, December 6th, 2011

Summary: Buy Photographically Speaking: A Deeper Look at Creating Stronger Images (the Kindle version or the Printed Version) now! David duChemin has written a fantastic book that clearly examines what it takes to make photographs that communicate. If you are serious about photography, read this book!

Perhaps the steepest learning curve in photography is learning to see as the camera sees.

Review: David duChemin has his own way of talking about photographs. Rather than using standard vocabulary of art criticism, he prefers to talk about the Message, Elements, and Decisions.

The camera will create an illusion the moment we release the shutter; if we want a hand in creating that illusion, we need to understand it.

He states that first you have to see the 2-D image that the camera will make when you shoot a 3-D subject. By seeing and detecting the lines and shapes that the camera will record, you will be better able to control what the photograph will communicate. The Message is what you intend to say, the Elements are what is within the frame, and the Decisions are the choices made for aperture, speed, ISO, point of view, etc.

This is not a book for everyone. If you shoot intuitively and don’t want to think, this book isn’t for you. The book covers a lot of the same territory that I cover in my beginning lectures. My approach is that you need to learn as much as possible about your tool, the camera, to improve your skills. The process is probably going to be painful but it is the best way to improve your photography. In my mind, if you don’t know anything about how a camera works, you are using your lizard brain to take photographs. This is the part of our brain that we share with reptiles. Unfortunately,our lizard brains don’t want to take photographs. Mainly, our lizard brains want to eat and have sex. If you don’t believe me, next time you are confronted by an alligator, give him your camera and see what happens.

How to Avoid the Top 6 Mistakes in the Professional Photography Business

Friday, December 2nd, 2011
My Take: If you are thinking about going pro, read this post by Nigel Merrick. Nigel is a professional photographer, blogger and business coach for other working photographers. Nigel’s blog ( http://www.zenologue.com/ ) helps professional photographers find peace in their business, love from their clients, and happiness in their personal lives by clarifying their focus on business and marketing.When you create your business plan, you must target your market and determine what services or kinds of photography you plan to sell. “Everyone and everything” are not the correct answers to these questions. The way you promote yourself will be determined by how you answer these questions. If you aren’t targeted, your efforts will be unfocused and ineffective.

As something of an interesting experiment, I asked my Twitter followers to answer the question: “What are the top business errors by ‘rookie’ photographers?” Within just a few minutes I had several great responses, and thought they would make a great article.

It’s one thing to be a great photographer, but very much another to be the owner of a successful photography business. In fact, I’ve seen far too many technically talented photographers suffer through difficult times, while observing others who seem less qualified sail right on by.

The main difference in these two outcomes lies in the photographer’s understanding of the importance of business knowledge.

You’re A Photography Business Owner – Not A Photographer Click to continue »

Article source: http://ezinearticles.com/6719665